About Rock n Roll and Rock music

About Rock n Roll and Rock music

When people think of rock and roll and its beginnings, they tend to leave out the blues, country and rhythm and blues roots. For instance, B.B. King was the bluesman who started the “lead guitar” trend, which has been used ever since, in all rock and roll bands. Another example is the songs that made Elvis Presley into a rock and roll legend, songs that were originally written and performed by musicians such as Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup and Wyonnie Harris.

As it turns out, many of the famous sixties bands like Rolling Stones, Cream, Fleetwood Mac, The Yardbirds and Canned Heat went on to offer their young audiences many of the original blues songs, with their own creative input and new ways of singing.

After the beginning of recorded blues, r&b and country music, we find that the influences of rock’n’roll are some particular subgenres like:
– bluegrass (country music),
– boogie-woogie (John Lee Hooker’s Boogie Chillin’ started the guitar boogie concept),
– gospel ( a huge influence for the 50s acapella and doo-wop singers),
– jazz (the first to bring jazz into rock and roll were Miles Davis and Thelonius Monk, with their hard bop 50s style) and
– rhythm & blues (early rock’n’roll tunes were interpretations of old r&b songs like Elvis Presley’s “Good Rockin’ Tonite” – a Roy Brown original).

Having the starting ingredients for rock and roll, the genre would also need someone to market it. Since the ASCAP (American Society of Composers and Publishers) would deny the radio stations any race music or genre related to it, the BMI (Broadcast Music Incorporated) was created in the 40s and signed rhythm & blues, “hillbilly” country music and later rock’n’roll, exactly what the broadcasters started demanding for their teenage audience.
As far as starting the true rock and roll revolution, nothing would’ve been possible if it weren’t for small record companies like Atlantic, Jubilee, Chess, Motown, Sun, Roulette and more.